Social Media 4 Recruitment

Work4Labs webinar – Demo Day with Kurt

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The webinar claimed that it would cover the following four areas:

  1. Why Facebook?
  2. Challenges of Facebook
  3. Components of social media success
  4. Q&A (this didn’t really happen, I think everyone was ready to go by this point)

 

The majority of the webinar was on point 3, with the answer – unsurprisingly – matching perfectly with what the Work4Labs Facebook app can now do. To be fair, it is pretty impressive – at a cost. But apparently it is now used by 1 in 4 Fortune 500 companies.

1. Why Facebook?

There was nothing ground-breaking here, but some nice stats – 18.4 million Americans found a job through Facebook last year, 73% of employer have successfully hired through social media, 84% of the US population are passive job seekers, 1 in 7 online minutes are now spent on Facebook. It’s big. Really big. But we already knew that.

2. Challenges of Facebook

Again, nothing we haven’t heard before, but I did like this section because it presented the challenges very clearly from a client perspective, something we might sometimes forget. The challenges addressed were:

  1. Is Facebook a good platform for social recruitment?
  2. Where do I start?
  3. How do I leverage my Facebook fan base?
  4. How do I drive engagement with my employees?
  5. How do I find the best candidates?
  6. I want to go mobile, but how?
  7. Is there a solution that can simplify all this?

 

Basically presenting it as “Facebook is big and scary and I am busy and important and don’t have time to figure it all out”.

3. Components of social media success

As mentioned, this basically addressed the points above and showed how the app addresses them all. It was quite a neat way of doing it and the custom app can do some very clever things, providing all of the following:

  1. Social career site in a friendly, familiar environment (i.e. Facebook), which can be adapted to mirror a careers site in a number of ways.
  2. Employer branding – you can do quite a lot with this on the custom app, including clickable banners and videos.
  3. Talent communities – there is functionality for speculative CVs.
  4. Social job distribution – sharing buttons integrated into job description, see jobs that match you and your friends, set up auto-job distribution across various social networks (I was sceptical, but it actually sounds pretty well thought-out).
  5. Recruitment ads included – nothing special here.
  6. Employee referrals – you can email employees and send them reminder emails, which let them know of current jobs, who they know who would be suitable for the jobs, and easily let you send the job on to them.
  7. Mobile site looks pretty slick and allows for easy online application, including auto-populated fields where possible and the ability to send the job to your computer, where it will remember where you got to in the application process.
  8. Easily integrates with Taleo, Kenexa and a few other ATS’s (although by no means all of them). The app tracks up until candidates click apply, and the jobs can also be tagged so you can track the whole process through an ATS.

 

The minimum annual cost for a custom app is $7,200, with prices going up to around $32,000 if you want all the clever stuff. However, this did inspire me to look at the basic app, and it is much better than it was when we gave up on it. Most importantly, there are now unlimited job slots available, even on the basic plan. A full comparison of Basic, Pro and Enterprise can be found here, and I was pleasantly surprised.

There are a couple of downsides. Potentially the biggest problems are that you need Enterprise to feature in the Facebook Jobs app (although that might not be such a big loss) and that you still need people to apply through Facebook rather than directing them to an external careers site (although I reckon we can get around that by including a link in the job description instead).

I seriously think it does now look like a much more appealing option than it used to. It looks like they realised the competition was catching up and massively upped their game.

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